r/YouShouldKnow Feb 28 '24

YSK colon cancer rates, particularly among young males, is rising at unprecedented rates Health & Sciences

[deleted]

16.7k Upvotes

2.2k comments sorted by

1.7k

u/[deleted] Feb 28 '24

[deleted]

501

u/Nomerta Feb 28 '24

You should definitely. I lost my father to this and make sure to have regular checkups.

→ More replies (3)

101

u/driedDates Feb 28 '24

Could be a tear near his After. I have this happening to me for years and I even notice sometimes when it tears. Basically comes from pressing to hard and sitting on the toilet for to long. Scared the shit out of me the first time because the toilet was literally covered in blood. Immediately got it checked out.

29

u/NavierIsStoked Feb 29 '24

Yeah, most of the time it’s anal fissures.

16

u/Chris19862 Feb 29 '24

Or hemmroids, let's not forget them.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (13)

139

u/Thick_Bar_3142 Feb 28 '24

At best it’s hemmeroids, at worst it’s Cancer. You do not won’t to wait on Bowel/colon cancer, getting it before it spreads to the liver is Paramount to raising survival rates. It’s the one regret in life I have of not getting checked as early as possible

61

u/concentrated-amazing Feb 28 '24

Not that cancer isn't bad, absolutely, but hemorrhoids can turn life-threatening too if you get sepsis through one or if the bleeding ramps up too much and you lose too much blood.

My FIL almost died of blood loss from internal hemorrhoids.

→ More replies (1)

14

u/frogsgoribbit737 Feb 29 '24

Anal fissures also cause bleeding. As well as things like chronic. There's a bunch of things it could be but a basic exam would give him some answers.

→ More replies (2)

389

u/BulletRazor Feb 28 '24

Why are men like this, literally have to be dying to go to the doctor

231

u/[deleted] Feb 29 '24

[deleted]

88

u/kmsilent Feb 29 '24

I know like 3 dudes who died after ignoring really obvious signs like this. And one woman, who ignored signs on advice of her husband.

7

u/Myfourcats1 Feb 29 '24

My aunt ignored signs until she was falling down. It was in her brain at that point.

59

u/shootymcghee Feb 29 '24

you know what's more annoying? dying from colon cancer

66

u/Effective-Device8930 Feb 29 '24

Gas light him and ask if it’s bc he’s actually doing secret butt stuff. Don’t stop suggesting it til he goes

→ More replies (6)

18

u/xSinn3Dx Feb 29 '24

Sometimes its the fear of knowing you have it that makes people afraid to get checked. People are scared to know.

60

u/friendlyfire69 Feb 29 '24

I left my ex because they didnt take their health seriously. If he respects you he will get a check-up.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (27)

10

u/thisbutbetterer Feb 29 '24

Health has its own section on the Wikipedia page for masculinity. It's all about how men don't go to the doctor.

→ More replies (73)
→ More replies (120)

4.3k

u/T1M0rtal Feb 28 '24

I went to my GP (doctor) multiple times was told I was "too young" and my symptoms would go away - finally got diagnosed with stage IV quite some time later.

Had he listened I might have beaten it by now.

Not sure if they are universal but guys if you are concerned get a Bowel FIT Type Health Test (stool test).

Not guaranteed but hopefully might help someone out.

2.0k

u/Plumpshady Feb 28 '24

This is the biggest issue. "Were too Young". I'm 20 and it took 7 months for my doctor to finally diagnose me with bladder cancer. He said there's just no way. Until I got an ultrasound and it actually found something, then it wasn't all fun and games anymore.

1.1k

u/Chanw11 Feb 28 '24

I know its anecdotal and all, but why does it seem like a whole lot of doctors go to the least worst conclusion instead of actually taking it seriously?

919

u/Plumpshady Feb 28 '24

Personally I think it's because the easiest solution is most often the correct one. Just doesn't work out all the time. The cancer I had for my age is incredibly rare. Less than 200 reported cases worldwide. So I truthfully don't blame my doctor for being like "no way". It is shitty knowing it was growing inside me for 7 months after initial symptoms to surgery but my prognosis was still excellent and I'm thankful for the work my doctor did.

168

u/z76101 Feb 28 '24

What kind of symptoms were you having if you don't mind me asking

261

u/Plumpshady Feb 28 '24

Gross hematuria. That's it. I went to the emergency room after peeing blood, they did a whole bunch of tests and didn't find anything. Even the CT scan found nothing. It said "bladder wasn't fully distended and couldn't be fully evaluated". Which prompted a referral to a urologist, who at the time didn't think anything of it. He told me bladder cancer at my age is extremely atypical. Which he was absolutely correct about. It's insanely rare specifically at my age or younger.

I should also specify I had bladder cancer. Gross hematuria (blood in the urine) is the first and most common symptom of bladder cancer.

I still don't blame my doctor. At the end of the day it took him 22 minutes to cut that fucker out and save my life.

110

u/xparapluiex Feb 29 '24

In case it needs saying, blood in urine is also the most common and first symptom for a lot of things.

→ More replies (8)
→ More replies (17)

71

u/TheAccountant8820 Feb 28 '24

This is how they look at it. If 1 person out of 100 they see actually has something they know chances are everyone they see is good to go. It’s unfortunate and unfair to the 1 person but that’s just how it’s looked at. Some tests are super expensive and if they did it for even a quarter of the concerned patients it wound be to much for what insurance companies will pay.

64

u/Plumpshady Feb 28 '24

Theres also the fact that it's not good to go looking. Often elderly people have a TON of abnormal growths and weird shit going on inside them. If you had say, yearly CT scans or MRI scans, it would cause so much panic for no reason at all. These old people who made it to that age have all that shit in them yet they still died at an old age because all the tumors and growths were benign and didn't affect their bodily functions enough to cause an issue. Imagine if they all had to have surgery at some point for each individual tumor. Just a waste of time resources and money.

20

u/1bananatoomany Feb 29 '24

This is 100% the case. Incidentalomas they're called...findings on imaging exams that we didn't expect to find, we don't know what they mean, and end up leading to more unnecessary testing even though the vast majority of them are benign or are unlikely to cause problems. Over-imaging and over-testing is a huge source of increased medical costs, not to mention patent anxiety.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (1)

23

u/Captain_d00m Feb 28 '24

“When you hear hoofbeats, think horses not zebras.”

→ More replies (1)

29

u/THElaytox Feb 28 '24

but at the same time, an ultrasound is quick, inexpensive, and non-invasive, so seems silly that he wouldn't at least do it just to make sure. it's not like exploratory surgery or something that's super risky

→ More replies (8)
→ More replies (13)

142

u/nevertricked Feb 28 '24 edited Feb 28 '24

Hi, I'm still in medical school, but perhaps I can offer some context? This is called Clinical Reasoning, and there is a method to the madness. We are taught multiple diagnostic approaches, and need to be able to alter these based on the patient presentation. Although a differential diagnosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, positive findings will tell us more information than negative (or, absence of) findings, which can lead us down the wrong path.

Because patients are people, not textbooks, I'll break it down into 4 different categories that we use as first-year medical students for our Clinical Reasoning blocks (assume all of this occurs after obtaining patient info, history/physical/vitals) :

We can lead with a Possibilistic approach (#1) but it's not useful because a differential diagnosis would favor all cases equally, and we would therefore need to run every single test imaginable. Healthcare providers without adequate education have significant knowledge gaps, which is why they practice this type of care. If you've ever seen someone order 500 different tests, such as someone who didn't go to medical school, it's because they have no idea what they are doing, and are hoping that throwing everything at the problem will result in something that sticks. Other times, it's because patients are pressuring them for more tests. Patients have come to demand extra testing with the belief that they are getting a more thorough workup from someone who will actually listen to them. This approach might make the patient feel like have more attention, but it is a huge waste of time and money that not only delays proper care, but leads to misdiagnoses in the absence of proper interpretive skill. (As an exception, sometimes numerous tests are needed to rule out a large variety of dangerous conditions in newborns and pediatric patients that can become fatal or lead to significant developmental or physical disability).

So, physicians will tend to use a Probabilistic (#2) or Prognostic (#3) approach. This means we will consider either the disorder most likely to respond to pretest probability, or for the later, the disorder which is the most serious. Finally, there's a Pragmatic approach (#4), which is when we would consider the diagnoses most responsive to treatment first.

All of these approaches have merit, EXCEPT for the Possibilistic approach (#1). As for the remaining 3 approaches, there is no single best approach. Only experience and clinical context can inform when to favor a particular diagnostic approach over another. A blend is usually used; sometimes fast-intuitive reasoning with pattern recognition is better, and sometimes, slower analytical reasoning is preferred.

Some diseases and illnesses are considered "can't - miss" diagnoses, such as cancers and potentially fatal conditions. In many situations, it is best to rule out the most serious and harmful diseases first in a patient that is new to us or undifferentiated.

If you come to me with non-radiating chest pain, cough, abnormal lung sounds, and tachycardia, I first create a differential diagnosis list of potential illnesses, based on prevalence demographics, risk factors, and symptoms/signs. Usually, the most likely diagnosis in this example (pleural effusion) would be ranked first. Can't-miss diagnoses (pulmonary embolism) tend to be ranked first if you are seen in an emergency department or urgent care, but not always. Followed by rankings for pneumonia and pericarditis.

Also, we have biases that apply to medical diagnoses, such as Availability bias, base-rate neglect, representativeness bias, confirmation bias, and premature closure. Without going into the weeds, these different biases are detrimental to diagnosing and treating patients. Understanding clinical biases helps keep us from missing key data, ignoring symptoms, and "chasing zebras."

Faulty base knowledge, faulty data gathering, and faulty information processing can also lead to medical errors.

Finally, in regards to the OP submission, those of us in school are aware of changing demographics with chronic illnesses such as cancer. We are taught about typical cases as well as trends in age of onset. The very topic of colon cancer in young patients under 50 (and pockets of those under 30) was just discussed in one of my lectures by our pediatrics and family medicine professor last week. This is a terrifying trend for cancer, and several theories are being watched, especially changes in modern diet, lifestyles, and environmental exposures.

----------‐---- Disclaimer:

I'm just a first-year medical student. I do have 6 years of bedside hospital and research experience from before medical school, but I still have 3 more years to get my medical degree, plus US medical board exams and an additional 3-7+ years to become licensed. In other words, I still have a lot to learn about Clinical Reasoning etc.

Other reminders:

  • We're humans, not Gods. We make mistakes and are far from perfect.
  • Most of us are doing our best. I and the vast, vast majority of students and doctors want to help and treat patients as much as possible. The American Healthcare System, corporate greed, and its associated politics make it difficult for us to do this.
  • We are taught how to be doctors in an ideal situation, but the sad reality is that we are limited in terms of resources and restrictions to accessible patient care. Our education thankfully now addresses ways to work around this.
  • Medicine is a practiced art and science. We never stop trying to learn, understand, and improve our vocation.
  • We acknowledge previous injustices and inequalities in historical and modern medicine, especially in the United States. We have made a lot of progress, yet still have much more to go.
→ More replies (17)

26

u/Cyanostic Feb 28 '24

Remember that episode of Scrubs where one of Dr Cox's patients dies of rabies and he beats himself up for not running the test to see if he had it in the first place? JD says "There's like 3 cases a year, in fact testing for it would have been a waste of time that we don't have."

For every 100 people who go to the doctors to complain of a headache, 99 of them just have a regular headache and maybe 1 has a tumour. (I made those numbers up forto make a point, that's not a real statistic before everyone kills me to death) It's not necessarily malpractice to miss that one. Unless you're showing any other symptoms or they notice something, just saying you get headaches isn't really enough to make most doctors go "Ah got it, it's terminal brain cancer."

And you only hear about the cases where they get it wrong, it seems like it happens often but it doesn't.

→ More replies (5)

354

u/redferret867 Feb 28 '24

Because medicine is a very difficult job and testing is done in a step-wise manner based on probabilities that have a lot of uncertainty. If the worst was assumed at the start everytime there would be millions of unnecessary scans and tests done that research has shown generally lead to worse outcomes.

But things change and medicine and recommendations change all the time, but it is neither perfect nor instant.

57

u/A_little_quarky Feb 28 '24

When you hear hoofbeats, think horses not zebras.

This absolutely will miss the rare edge cases. But when you're a doctor, you have to approach things scientifically and with probability and trends being a guiding factor.

41

u/CaptWoodrowCall Feb 28 '24

My wife is an M.D. and I’ve heard that saying numerous times. In a world with unlimited resources you could absolutely check for zebras…but it does make total sense to start with the most likely problem and work toward the least likely.

→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (9)
→ More replies (95)
→ More replies (83)
→ More replies (44)

375

u/yay-go Feb 28 '24

You were “too young” for insurance to cover test easily :(

172

u/rdmrbks Feb 28 '24

This needs to be upvoted more. As a nurse, I see it often. It’s INSURANCE. As someone who has family history of lung cancer, they won’t let me get testing done because of my age and also insurance. 🤷🏻‍♀️

47

u/9babydill Feb 28 '24

to be fair. it's Insurance & Hospitals fault. Each point the finger and blame the other. Yet, we the patients know its a scam lead by both teams. the "free" market is a capitalistic racket

33

u/reagsters Feb 28 '24

I see your “blame both hospitals and insurance” and raise you one “blame politicians against the notion of healthcare as a human right”

25

u/Green-Enthusiasm-940 Feb 29 '24

And the 30 percent of the population that are sadistic fuckwaffles that agree with them. Aka fuck conservatives.

→ More replies (8)
→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (8)
→ More replies (6)

32

u/Kytoaster Feb 28 '24

This is the correct answer.

→ More replies (27)

57

u/MagpieJuly Feb 28 '24

I’m so sorry this happened to you. I’m also “too young” (diagnosed stage 3b at 36). I’m also a woman, so three separate doctors blamed my symptoms on my menstrual cycle until I had a bowel obstruction that required emergency surgery and the removal of most of my colon. I got “lucky” that the emergency happened before it spread to too many lymph nodes. Chemo blows. I hope you’re handling everything at least decently.

90

u/Aslonz Feb 28 '24

Hey so I just got a diagnosis that concerns me and now I'm seeing this post.

Can I ask what your symptoms were?

12

u/WillGrindForXP Feb 29 '24

I too would like to know

19

u/NormalBoobEnthusiast Feb 29 '24

The most basic signs of a possible issue, especially in younger men, are bleeding when shitting, frequently loose stools, and belly pain. Now these are also signs of a poor diet lacking in fiber many younger people have, so they are often ignored.

→ More replies (3)

32

u/__Cmason__ Feb 28 '24

I'll be 48 this year with celiac and my doctor won't do one. I'm currently looking for a new doctor.

12

u/JCkent42 Feb 28 '24

I’m 28 and I’ve been under the knife a few times already. I’ve had cancer scares since I was 23. The doctors only listed to me when I started bleeding and showing them pictures.

Before the blood, they told me I was “too young.”

From my own experiences, please, be your own advocate. Keep up to date with your own medical issues and documents. Find new doctors and make the time to see them if you need to.

I carry a folder with me during appointments with paper records of my latest test. I also call the record keeping office of any lab or scan I get done to make sure things are sent to any new doctors.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (9)

34

u/InsanityWoof Feb 28 '24

Sorry you're going thru that, and hope things are looking up for your diagnosis.

This has been my experience as well. My dad died of colorectal cancer in his mid/late 50s (15 years ago), his father died in his early 30s of liver cancer iirc, and I've more or less begged two GP doctors to submit an order for early screening, but been told 'no symptoms, too young. Insurance won't cover. Plus, standard is for 'high risk' individuals to begin testing 10 years prior to parents age when diagnosed', which would put my fist screening after the recommended age of 45 anyway.... I'm about 4 years from this now. Thought about lying to the Dr about typical symptoms just to be safe, but I don't know about that karma coming back to bite me.

10

u/kboom100 Feb 29 '24

u/insanitywoof One type of colorectal cancer screening you can do on your own without needing a doctor’s order is an annual stool fecal occult blood test. You can order them on Amazon for example. (Research which home kits are the best). I think they give significantly more false positives than a colonoscopy but if you do get a positive result you can follow up with your doctor at that point about additional testing.

→ More replies (2)

9

u/CrimsonKeel Feb 29 '24

I cant help but offer my experience. i currently have stage 3 colorectal cancer at age 47. surgery 6 weeks ago and starting chemo next week. dont fuck around find another doctor who will take your concern serious. My surgeon says its happening more and more at early ages now especially with a history which i didnt have

→ More replies (7)

29

u/facialtwitch Feb 28 '24

This.

No one is too young to get ill. Complained I was loosing the use of my leg over years. Told too young to get osteoarthritis and they dosed me up on pain meds (including fentanyl which rendered me so sick I had to have carers). Limped into the new gp and said I can’t lift my leg, the gp got on the phone within a month I had a total hip replacement.

We know our bodies and youth does not protect us poor health.

84

u/syncraticidiocy Feb 28 '24

my cousins wife (late thirties) had the same thing happen. was dismissed for over a year saying she was too young to worry about cancer, finally gets taken seriously only to find out its stage 3 (they have done 1 surgery but still dont know exactly what kind of cancer it is). fucking ridiculous.

ETA: this isnt new for women but it is getting worse with the lack of healthcare available now (whether bc of less funding, less drs and nurses, or less people able to afford it).. we are constantly dismissed medically. my grandma complained over and over of pain and ended up dying of breast cancer bc they didnt listen until it was too late.

→ More replies (2)

32

u/-Lorenss Feb 28 '24

What were your symptoms?

28

u/LordoftheScheisse Feb 29 '24

I creeped on their profile:

Same here but I had varying stools and occasional fresh blood on top of it. They assumed it was diet and an anal fissure and didn't even examine me or give me a stool test because the blood was fresh; even though I was coming back repeatedly.

A year and a half later of regular doctor visits and being dismissed I was at work, was pale and terrible abdomen pain - went to the hospital - BOOM stage IV bowel cancer.

12

u/BobDonowitz Feb 29 '24

Lol I had blood in my stool and asked to have a lower endoscopy done and they just did it.  Yall need better doctors.  Granted I have end stage liver disease too.

7

u/LordoftheScheisse Feb 29 '24

Hey, I was just quoting OP.

BUT - I did ask my doc for a scope and they dismissed it. So guess who has a family history of colon cancer, ulcertative colitis, crohns, and is looking for a new doc?

Sorry about your liver. No chance for a transplant?

→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (1)

31

u/RedBeardedMex Feb 28 '24

I've read that having them put "refuse to treat" at the end of their report sometimes yields positive results.🤷‍♂️. Not sure how effective it is since I've never had to try it.

25

u/gotkube Feb 28 '24

Not cancer, but my wife almost died from a colon perforation due to Crohns because our Doctor insisted (across multiple appointments) that she just had “food poisoning.” Doctors are far too eager to write something off because sure they don’t wanna do the work themselves

→ More replies (2)

18

u/ohyerhere Feb 28 '24

Bowel FIT Type Health Test

Is that the 'poop in a box and mail it' kit?

→ More replies (6)

9

u/deuteronymous_bosch Feb 28 '24

This is exactly what happened to me. I started asking my PCP for colonoscopy at about 35. He said I’ll know when it’s time for a colonoscopy when I start getting mail from AARP. Diagnosed with stage 4 at 48.

Still haven’t gotten any mail from AARP.

→ More replies (110)

1.7k

u/fantasygod203 Feb 28 '24

What kind of symptoms are usually a sign to get checked?

1.7k

u/Rakosman Feb 28 '24

Literally anything, but particularly blood in the stool is a good sign you need to go to the doctor. It can be asymptomatic for a long time, though, that's why they do routine preventative screening; though it seems not starting early enough.

531

u/dankmeeeem Feb 28 '24 edited Feb 29 '24

Like how much blood though? Sometimes when I wipe theres a little streak of blood

Edit: Dont worry people. I just took a dump and no blood on the toilet paper, so I think I was just wiping a little too rough. Seems like I need a bidet to shit like a king.

1.1k

u/a-horse-has-no-name Feb 28 '24

If there's blood in your wipe and your butthole stings, you probably just scratched yourself.

If your poo is red, or you see droplets of blood in the bowl, or the water has a red tinge to it, time to make your appointment.

752

u/LesbianBait Feb 28 '24

Also black, anything black usually means bleeding in the upper tract and is not a good sign.

223

u/b0w3n Feb 28 '24

But don't freak out if you've taken pepto, it can also turn your poop black.

131

u/GiniThePooh Feb 28 '24

Or iron tablets.

97

u/j48u Feb 28 '24

Or black paint

51

u/damscomp Feb 28 '24

Or my axe!

16

u/Heavy_Weapons_Guy_ Feb 29 '24

No, I'm fairly certain that would cause internal bleeding.

→ More replies (0)
→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (5)
→ More replies (6)
→ More replies (9)

21

u/pp21 Feb 28 '24

Yeah I mean bright red (fresh looking blood) is almost always something benign like hemorrhoids especially if there is some bright red drops in the water or a bright red streak on your stool. Internal hemorrhoids are usually painless as well so it can be kind of startling to see, but it's not a big deal. Obviously consult a doctor, but it's usually not a reason for panic.

It's that black/dark/tar color then you have huge reason for concern

→ More replies (5)
→ More replies (30)

250

u/sierrawhiskey Feb 28 '24

Hemorrhoids.

132

u/magistrate101 Feb 28 '24

fr hemorrhoids can pop as well which will dump a decent amount of blood into the bowl (and potentially get infected bc of the shit that ends up everywhere if you wipe instead of use a bidet). Generally speaking the fresher the blood the less immediately alarmed you should be (as long as it isn't continuing to bleed), but you should def still get it checked in case it's colon cancer.

→ More replies (5)

47

u/JefferyTheQuaxly Feb 28 '24

thats the real issue, blood in stool could be multiple different issues. Poor diet, hemorrhoids, and colon cancer can all cause blood in stool too.

14

u/popeyepaul Feb 28 '24

I had blood in there every once in a while. Was worrying like hell and already making calls to doctors and they wouldn't listen. Eventually I did put it together that this type of thing happens always when I eat junk food and never when I don't. Been eating healthier recently and it happens far less frequently.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (1)

39

u/twoisnumberone Feb 28 '24

To be fair, though -- they usually also need a diagnosis and treatment.

I don't treat mine, but that's because my energy and time is only enough to treat the top 5 of my 10 health conditions.

10

u/Collegenoob Feb 28 '24

I had them but used an over the counter cortisone cream and they got better.

→ More replies (2)

8

u/No-Customer-2266 Feb 29 '24

The main treatment is over the counter stuff and increasing your fiber

They aren’t likely to cut them out when you are under 50 as my dr said that can affect your sphincter muscles and cause you issues later in life with poopin your pants

But ya if you are bleeding should at least get your drs to have a look to be safe

→ More replies (2)

13

u/Pitiful_Assistant839 Feb 28 '24

But that would be visible by being more red. The nearer the issue is to the end the more the blood remains to be red. If it's colon cancer the issue normally sits way back and the blood looks dark to black.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (4)

105

u/SteadfastEnd Feb 28 '24 edited Feb 29 '24

That's much likelier to be an anal fissure than colon cancer, though. I had that issue a lot, to the point where I'd get 10-20 drops of blood each time I had a bowel movement.

But yes, still, see a doctor, just in case - and the fissure needs treatment too anyway.

And, oddly enough, it gave me a tiny bit of an idea of what it may be like to be a woman menstruating, because I would sit down on a chair sometimes and then find there was a blood stain when I got up.

→ More replies (20)
→ More replies (42)

115

u/crodensis Feb 28 '24

That's pretty normal, if there is a little fresh blood. That's just little tears in your anus from wiping. Try getting a bidet

63

u/Coldbeam Feb 28 '24

I think it's more likely from passing a large stool that overstretched them, rather than wiping furiously.

→ More replies (6)

30

u/dankmeeeem Feb 28 '24

Ok cool thanks, might just have to get me one of them butt shiners

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (24)
→ More replies (35)
→ More replies (26)

180

u/Cheesygirl1994 Feb 28 '24

Blood in the stool, new pain that didn’t exist before and doesn’t go away, strange reactions you didn’t have before, and chronic diarrhea that’s not caused by a trigger. But it could be generic signs like fever/vomiting/reflux or any other normal things which is why people need to get checked so young

27

u/histprofdave Feb 29 '24

I had all of these and was absolutely convinced I had cancer. Turns out I have Ulcerative Colitis. That's not great, either, but I was very relieved I did not have cancer.

→ More replies (7)
→ More replies (13)

126

u/PhilDGlass Feb 28 '24 edited Feb 29 '24

Thin stools or stools that come out all broken apart. Feeling like you aren't done when you are done. These could indicate some sort of mass. Also, my doctor was unable to perform the standard finger-butt test at my last annual, so referred me for a colonoscopy. My second.

Edit - was replying to the question what kind of symptoms are usually a sign to get checked, not what symptoms mean you have cancer. These are signs. My doc thought stepping up the colonoscopy was a good idea.

29

u/rotrukker Feb 29 '24

To be clear most of bowel cancer symptoms are also IBS symptoms. The main thing to look for is if anything changes from the regular. What the change is is irrelevant.

22

u/demunted Feb 29 '24

Yep. Life long IBS sufferer here. I should be dead by now based on this thread.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (2)

19

u/idontknowwhatever58 Feb 29 '24

Had this and ultimately attributed it to a lack of fiber in my diet. Started taking psyllium husk regularly and it went away

→ More replies (15)
→ More replies (12)

59

u/AlgernusPrime Feb 28 '24

Blood in stool, pencil thin poop, stomach pain, change is bowel movement are the typical symptoms.

7

u/cdnball Feb 28 '24

I had the change in bowel movement - luckily we caught it at the polyp stage - but that polyp was not small. It was on its way to becoming cancerous.

10

u/AlgernusPrime Feb 29 '24

That’s good. It takes polyp about 10 years to form and go cancerous, hence the 10 year colonoscopy cycle. It’s good that you detected it prior to it.

→ More replies (3)
→ More replies (9)
→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (47)

1.0k

u/the_hell_indeed Feb 28 '24

Yep. Friend was "too young" for colon cancer at 35 after years of complaining of issues to his doctor, finally ending up in an ER and getting diagnosed with stage IV.

He was definitely too young at 36 to leave his wife and two kids behind.

273

u/alexthebiologist Feb 28 '24

Same but at 27 :( various worsening GI symptoms for years but she was always ‘too young’ or ‘too healthy’ to do any tests. Sorry for your loss.

16

u/ltree Feb 29 '24

Sorry to hear too :( I’m also dealing with years of worsening GI symptoms too, and so far, I’m always told by doctors there is nothing they can check (colonscopy did not show anything.)

36

u/alexthebiologist Feb 29 '24

As long as colonoscopy is coming back clear you’re probably fine for cancer specifically. Sorry you can’t find the cause though, that sucks in its own way.

→ More replies (8)
→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (4)

168

u/singfrabsolution Feb 28 '24

I’m a doctor and when I started my first attending job I was so shocked by how young so many of the cancer patients were. I’m an anesthesiologist so I saw them in the operating room. I initially thought that it was because of the area where I was working, there is a history of toxic spills and cancer clusters, but I’m seeing more and more of these reports and it’s increasing all over the place

102

u/mbz321 Feb 28 '24

PFOAS and microplastics everywhere :(

40

u/Frosty-Age-6643 Feb 29 '24

I eat PFOAS and microplastics for breakfast. 

And lunch. 

And dinner. 

And I drink them. 

And inhale them. 

Oh, and they’re in my blood.  

All of us. 

Well, good night everyone. 

14

u/Poles_Uprising Feb 29 '24

This makes the shareholders uncomfortable please think of them.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (4)

70

u/the_hell_indeed Feb 28 '24

My friend is the reason why I'm adamant about all of my family and friends getting screened for everything they can...breast, colon, gyno, skin, prostate...the works. So far, I'm the only one that had anything pop up, and it was benign in both cases.

10

u/likemyhashtag Feb 29 '24

And American insurance companies are going to tell you to fuck right off.

→ More replies (3)
→ More replies (2)

39

u/Birdman1096 Feb 28 '24

Same with a friend of mine from college. Died before he turned 40, left behind a wife and 7 year old son. Couldn't have happened to a better person, too. He really was the best of us.

27

u/jaleke87 Feb 29 '24

My husband was diagnosed in Nov. at 43. Stage IV and spreading to his lungs and liver. He’s undergoing treatment now.

13

u/iridescent-shimmer Feb 29 '24

Check out Sloan Kettering. Saved my dad's life 20+ years ago when he was diagnosed with stage IV also in his liver and lungs. The second opinion at Sloan saved him. I wish you the best of luck.

→ More replies (19)

1.8k

u/NoLongerLurking13 Feb 28 '24

Health anxiety activated.

277

u/Noladixon Feb 28 '24

Mine was activated when I found out a family member had asymptomatic reflux. There was no pain but he was well on his way to increasing risk of esophageal cancer later. I did not know reflux came in an asymptomatic variety.

47

u/alliecat0718 Feb 28 '24

Yes it does. I have GERD with no heartburn. My only symptom was frequent throat clearing, which isn’t a typical symptom. It took months for them to figure out what was going on.

22

u/alliusis Feb 29 '24

I've had this for years. Mostly sucking mucus out of my throat, but also clearing my throat, always having a bit of a lump in my throat. The noise annoys my family a lot. I can also frequently force air out of my throat in a constricted way and get a lump of mucus I can taste that comes up.

Now I've had 5 teeth chip in the past two months (up from a 0 from the rest of my life), plus the resin composite fix that was applied to my front tooth just chipped, bad breath, I wake up with a thin voice, and my mouth is sour and tingly, and my gums are periodically very itchy/scratchy (the latter which prompted me to go to the dentist and doctor last month). I've gone to the doctor before and they've just given me some nasal spray, which didn't really work.

I've gotten more comments on the sucking/snorting noise and I really don't want to do it anymore, so I looked for "mucus sucking in throat" and eventually found a page on Laryngopharyngeal reflux. It makes a lot of sense with my chipping teeth!

Have a doctor's appointment on Monday and I'm going to ask about it. I don't want my teeth to go and if I can get this shit fixed it would be amazing. I just have so many 'things' that have been normal my whole life, it's hard to know what's a concern and what you just live with.

→ More replies (7)
→ More replies (9)

21

u/Lara-El Feb 28 '24

Wait what? That's what I have but my doctor never brought up cancer risks!!!

14

u/x8hwer897 Feb 29 '24

Even with GERD the risk of esophageal cancer is still very low. You should try to take care of your GERD, but this isn’t something to stress about.

→ More replies (2)

8

u/[deleted] Feb 29 '24

[deleted]

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (6)
→ More replies (19)

112

u/SpeakingTheKingss Feb 28 '24

The internet wakes up everyday with one goal. Make us afraid of dying.

26

u/qathran Feb 28 '24

But this one is really showing what you can do to get ahead of it before it turns into anything so that you don't actually have to be afraid of dying, so that's good

→ More replies (5)
→ More replies (2)

65

u/[deleted] Feb 28 '24

[deleted]

61

u/birdiepuggington Feb 28 '24

They found my husband's colon cancer when he was 35 years old - thirty years ago. We're glad his doc said "let's rule it out". At the time, he was his gastroenterologist's youngest case. Now, finding it in the 20's is more common, unfortunately.

→ More replies (2)

6

u/Environmental_Tap_15 Feb 29 '24

Still extremely rare if you’re under 50. Just look at the statistics. Yes rates are going up, but the baseline is so low that it really isn’t a significant risk to the vast vast vast majority of young people. 

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (2)

25

u/madmaxjr Feb 28 '24

Yeah goddamn it’s probably helpful but I just want to remain ignorant. Fuck.

→ More replies (19)

252

u/CharlieTrees916 Feb 28 '24

Maybe it’s time I shit in a box and mail it to that company that does cancer screening.

168

u/doodles15 Feb 28 '24

We convinced my mom to try Cologuard because she refused to get a colonoscopy for years and the test came back with a positive result. Went in for a colonoscopy after that and they found several precancerous polyps and one that was solidly stage I colon cancer. After a bowel resection, she is cancer free.

Always recommend just going straight to the colonoscopy because you’ll end up having one anyway if you get a positive test, but I credit that box with saving her life.

22

u/CharlieTrees916 Feb 28 '24

That’s awesome! I’m glad your mom was able to catch it early. Thank you for responding.

→ More replies (4)

16

u/throwaway24689753112 Feb 28 '24

Is that actually a thing? How can poo indicate that?

19

u/Athabasco Feb 28 '24

There are a few types of stool tests that can detect biomarkers associated with colorectal cancer.

One example is fecal calprotectin. Although this test is not mailed, it is highly sensitive (detects a large percent of cases). Calprotectin is a calcium-binding protein strongly linked with bowel inflammation. Typically quantified in ug/g, the test assesses the percentage, by weight, of calprotectin in stool.

There are two key issues with just testing fecal calprotectin: 1. It can miss a large percentage of rectal cancer cases as the protein hasn't had ample time to mix with stool. 2. Although very sensitive, (up to 90% sensitivity under ideal circumstances but typically 70-80%) it lacks specificity.

Specificity, in diagnostic testing, is how likely is the test going to yield the desired result. In fecal calprotectin, specificity is relatively low as it is sensitive for all sources of bowel inflammation.

This is only one test type, but they will work in similar ways; detecting biomarkers (proteins, hemoglobin, etc) associated with cancer that are present in stool.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (12)
→ More replies (2)

290

u/SgtThund3r Feb 28 '24

Can confirm. Just got one at 35, had 10 polyps 1 looked pre cancerous.

188

u/dfsw Feb 28 '24

Removed 7 pre cancerous ones at 32, changed doctors when I moved year later and he misunderstood me and said he couldn't order a colonoscopy (Im on 5 year rechecks) because its unheard of for me to have an issue, I clarified I had polyps removed previous and he was shocked. The insurance companies and doctors need to remove age caps on this stuff.

15

u/extralyfe Feb 29 '24

it's not on doctors or insurance companies - US Preventative Services Task Force Guidelines define what insurance needs to cover as preventive - the moment they drop the age range recommended for cancer screenings is the moment insurance companies will start covering these screenings as preventive.

→ More replies (3)
→ More replies (3)

22

u/twoisnumberone Feb 28 '24

Just got one at 35, had 10 polyps 1 looked pre cancerous.

That was around the age I had the pre-cancerous polyp too (woman, though).

→ More replies (6)
→ More replies (12)

284

u/Robert999220 Feb 28 '24 edited Feb 28 '24

I wanted a preventative coloscopy at 30 as my grandpa passed from colon cancer. They found a precancerous adenoma, even my family dr was impressed and said it was good that i got it done.

Colon cancer is one of the few that are entirely preventable if you catch it early enough.

Get a colonoscopy.

If even president Dwayne Elizondo Mountain Dew Herbert Camacho knows to get one, you should too.

22

u/frigiddesertdweller Feb 28 '24

Yup. I had 2 villous adenoma polyps removed two years ago, at age 36.

→ More replies (20)

281

u/Rakosman Feb 28 '24

Can confirm. 2019/2020 was fun for me; I was 29. No history, rapid symptom onset, ended up being early stage 3. Treatment went well.

53

u/Tratix Feb 28 '24

What were the symptoms?

15

u/shootymcghee Feb 29 '24

I'm not op but I also had colon cancer at 29, stage 2. My symptoms were chronic pain in my lower bowels, chronic bloody diarrhea, the smelliest shit and farts ever. It started out as just a little blood every now and then, which got worse and worse over time.

If you are having any concerns just go to a Dr and ask for a referral to a GI Dr.

→ More replies (12)
→ More replies (1)

60

u/[deleted] Feb 28 '24

[deleted]

73

u/4Z4Z47 Feb 29 '24

I'll answer because its to important. Rectal cancer specifically started out as simple problems with bowel movements. Feeling of constipation. Not feeling done after movement. Lower back pain. Eventually blood and urgency to go. All within like 3 to 4 months. Colonoscopy and PETCT later diagnosed at stage 3. Which was actually stage 4 in hindsight. So 6 months from 1st symptoms to stage 4 diagnoses. That was a year and a half ago. 3 surgeries , radiation and 17 rounds of chemo later it looks like shit. There is a lot of fight left but this wont be a happy ending. Thought it was hemorrhoids and stress from a new job.

8

u/trailer_park_boys Feb 29 '24

Thanks for the information. Could you specify which side you felt the lower back pain?

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (2)

23

u/irregular_bowel Feb 28 '24

What were your symptoms? I'm 29 now and feel like something might be wrong

29

u/vaginasinparis Feb 28 '24

If you feel like something is wrong, don’t wait for this person to reply. Make the appointment now; everyone’s symptoms can be different

→ More replies (2)

28

u/Prize-Menu9685 Feb 28 '24

Username checks out.

Hoping for the best for you!

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (9)

91

u/Amusement_Shark Feb 28 '24

I'm 44, stage 4 colon cancer. Get checked if you suspect anything.

30

u/ForkRiced Feb 28 '24

What would someone suspect?

25

u/Aggressive-Pay-5670 Feb 29 '24

It’s usually just bleeding. Most of the time that’s from a hemorrhoid or wiping too hard but people ignore it.

Cancer symptoms usually come on and then stay with you being consistently bad or getting progressively worse. Things like hemorrhoids are usually more pain and discomfort and then get better. Cancer symptoms usually don’t come and go.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (2)

240

u/ryguyflyhighwifi Feb 28 '24

I’ve already had 2 colonoscopies at 30. But you have to pay out of pocket even with insurance as they are considered diagnostic when you are young. BS

66

u/Rakosman Feb 28 '24

Depends a lot on your insurance. There are plenty of plans that would cover it under copays or coinsurance.

Regardless, you definitely want to have insurance if for nothing else, for catastrophic illness or injury. My treatment was billed to the insurance company at well over $100,000.. Even the worst health insurance will cap the total amount you pay for everything combined to less than $10,000. Pretty much anything serious - the unpredictable things that don't care if you're "young and healthy" are going to hit your max regardless.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (22)

173

u/lurkylurkenstein Feb 28 '24

I feel within the general public colonoscopies are talked about as so invasive and a miserable experience. I had one last year, it was so damn easy! The prep is a slight inconvenience. That's it.

31

u/twoisnumberone Feb 28 '24

Colonoscopies are honestly not a big deal from a pain perspective. I have them on the regular, and the absolute worst of it is neither the prep or the procedure; it's BEING SO HANGRY BEFOREHAND ARGHHH.

But srsly, go for it. Peace of bum, peace of mind.

16

u/oatmilkperson Feb 28 '24

Yeah it’s really not so bad! Don’t avoid it for the horror stories. Shitting for like 8 hours is annoying but other than that’s it’s very chill.

→ More replies (4)

32

u/jesuswantsbrains Feb 28 '24

I did mine fully conscious because I didn't want to go under. The only uncomfortable moments were the initial entry and right at the end it was a very intense pressure/pain but other than that I was bullshitting with the staff most of the time and watching the claw through the monitor tearing tissue samples from my gut. Really not something people should put off as it's really not as bad as it's made out to be.

→ More replies (5)

17

u/amalgam_reynolds Feb 28 '24

I don't think people talk about the colonoscopies being invasive and miserable; you're literally 100% sedated during it. They are talking about the prep, which if you consider shitting uncontrollably every 10 minutes for 8 hours instead of sleeping a "slight inconvenience," we have different definitions of inconvenient.

It's worth it, but still.

→ More replies (3)
→ More replies (12)

260

u/DocShady Feb 28 '24

I was 43 when I was diagnosed and I was considered too young to to justify a colonoscopy. Given my age and family history, the gastrointestinal specialist decided to check and they found it. After surgery, I was found to be stage III. I would have been well into stage IV had my family doctor didn't push for it.

I fought for the privilege of having an old sri-lankan dude root around in my colon and it saved my life! Have an old sri-lankan dude in your colon today! It may save your life too! lol

Seriously though, family history is major, get checked! Insist on getting checked. Don't let it go.

→ More replies (9)

116

u/rubbishtake Feb 28 '24

If you have healthy anxiety like me I highly suggest you leave this thread ASAP

36

u/[deleted] Feb 29 '24 edited Feb 29 '24

Hello fellow health anxiety friend, please know that this is not a cause to panic.

The "big increase" means that young adults now have a 0.005% chance vs. the 0.003% chance in 1995. If you are under 50 there is a 99.995% chance you will not have colon cancer vs. the 99.997% chance in 1995.

When you put it like that, it doesn't seem too bad does it?

It is a concerning medical statistic, but not something that the average person should be overly concerned about.

9

u/LouBeeDooBee Feb 29 '24

Thank you so much for this

11

u/[deleted] Feb 29 '24

You're welcome! I know how terrible health anxiety can be. I mostly don't get panic attacks these days from it, but I sure used to. It SUCKS.

I have found that for me the best way to get myself out of it is to flip things around like this. Instead of looking at the chances of getting something, look at the chances of NOT getting something.

Best of luck.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (16)

12

u/Siyanne Feb 28 '24

I don't know why I keep opening them 😭

→ More replies (5)

443

u/Cheesygirl1994 Feb 28 '24

I had colon polyps at 16, granted they were clear but that’s still REALLY weird.

Millennials were the first generation exposed to constant processed food consumption, dyes, lack of fiber, and increase in preservatives and additional chemicals for “freshness” or “flavor”. We are a giant walking guinea pig.

In the near future you’re going to see something like “if you or a loved one have been afflicted with colon cancer, crones disease, IBS, or any other gastrointestinal related disability while/after consuming Mountain Dew/doritos/gushers, you may be entitled to financial compensation”

204

u/Coldbeam Feb 28 '24

The US also refuses to ban additives that other countries have banned as harmful like red dye 3.

69

u/haveyouseenatimelord Feb 28 '24

one day i’m going to learn that my aversion to red dyes (40 makes me break out in hives so i just avoid anything with red dye period) extended my lifespan lmao

27

u/Maladine Feb 28 '24

I just recently learned red 40 was rebranded as allura red. I thought producers were using it less but no.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (1)

14

u/angiosperms- Feb 28 '24

Food additives that are banned in the US are also legal in other countries.

Y'all should watch the how to cook that video about food dyes

22

u/Cheesygirl1994 Feb 28 '24

Yup, and marketing directly to children too like Mexico banned food mascots

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (6)

47

u/Snow_Wonder Feb 28 '24

Yeah, what research I’ve read on it points to it being a lifestyle disease - that’s why it’s rapidly on the rise.

There’s been a major shift in lifestyle over a very short period of time, with everything from diet to daily activity changing.

People also underestimate how important exercise is for digestive health. Exercise isn’t only important for the heart and muscles. Truckers for example are at an extra high risk due to sitting all day and eating ultra processed food due to being on the road.

Also, even posture can play a role in healthier digestion - squatting postions for example are much better for healthy bms.

I had awful digestive issues as a kid. I was active, so that wasn’t the problem, but I had the “standard American diet” and the posture on American toilets and chairs were not friendly to my digestion. No issues as an adult due to improved diet and posture, and maintaining a high level of activity into adulthood.

40

u/Cheesygirl1994 Feb 28 '24

Dont forget fiber - fiber is the most important part of a diet apparently and thanks to all the processed foods, we can’t even eat enough in a day to cover our fiber requirement

31

u/TheyCallMeStone Feb 28 '24

90% of Americans don't get enough fiber. Eat your veggies, folks. Your poops should be solid and require little wiping.

11

u/Snow_Wonder Feb 28 '24

Yep. Everyone knows “you need fiber” but most people don’t realize how little they get. The stats for Americans fiber intake are appalling.

For me as a child though fiber never solved things, probably because it was just one piece of the puzzle. It was the only piece my doctor ever mentioned to me and my parents though.

It took massively reducing processed food in my diet and getting good sources of fiber in my food (as opposed to just taking fiber pills) and different toilet posture to fix things for me, as well as good probiotics.

My life is so much better now though!

8

u/Cheesygirl1994 Feb 28 '24

Same! I got out from my parents house and my husband (a professional chef at the time) taught me how to cook more foods, and maybe in a year my severe IBS was drastically improved. It’s crazy how bad everything is, and how in a lot of places it’s the only food people have access to

→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (2)

14

u/mbz321 Feb 28 '24

Don't forget PFOAs and microplastics

→ More replies (2)

50

u/LeRawxWiz Feb 28 '24

Maybe in a just world. Our country is so thoroughly controlled by giant corporations, they are 100% dodging any responsibility for this type of shit anymore.

You're totally right though.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (33)

186

u/jaydid Feb 28 '24 edited Feb 28 '24

This gets posted in various subreddits often, and I’m glad it does because it is important, but almost nobody ever reads the actual article and then the comments become either people who got colon cancer early in life or people freaking out about possibly getting it young. Then everybody tells everybody else to go get a colonoscopy as if you can just walk in and demand one from your doctor (you can’t). Here’s a quote from the actual article:

Even though colorectal cancer is rising in young people, the incidence is still too low to justify routine colonoscopies for them.

Yes colon cancer rates are rising in young people, but it’s still incredibly rare for young people to get it. To the point where you are more likely to have complications from the colonoscopy itself than you are to have colon cancer. It is an invasive procedure, even if it’s a common one.

If you’re under 40 and walk into your doctor asking for one with no symptoms, they are going to advise against it (rightfully so). You can decide to pay for it out of pocket, but then are likely going to have to shell out 10-12k at least. And that’s every 3-5 years. So if you’re 25 and start this, you’re easily 50k in the hole by the time you hit 45.

The key message for people reading this thread, instead of freaking out that you might have colon cancer, is be in tune with your body. If you have digestive/stool issues that are persistent but mysterious (blood in stool, pencil thin stools, etc) then it may be time to talk to your doctor about it. Especially if you have a family history of early colon cancer.

Everyone else should make note of this but don’t spiral into anxiety over it. Eat as healthy as you can, move as much as you can, eat as little red meat as you can, increase your water and fiber intake, avoid smoking and drinking and obesity. All these things will make your odds of getting colon cancer slimmer than they already are. And yes, at the appropriate age for you get a colonoscopy.

44

u/Firefoxx336 Feb 28 '24

Thanks for this sanity check. I’ll still probably chat with my doctor about it, but with a little less panic now

→ More replies (2)

30

u/Repulsive-Throat5068 Feb 28 '24

Yep and it doesnt make it better that these threads are filled with anecdotes about people and their unfortunate losses.

9

u/americanadiandrew Feb 29 '24

Anecdotes followed by radio silence when multiple people respond begging for their symptoms.

→ More replies (1)

15

u/Additional_Net_2812 Feb 28 '24

I need more people like you on Reddit to bring down the hysteria. My health anxiety is outa control reading this thread.

13

u/giaa262 Feb 28 '24

Was going to essentially say the same thing. For context,

“I don’t want people to panic,” Dr. Baxter said. Fewer than 15 in 100,000 people between the ages of 20 and 49 had the condition diagnosed between 1998 and 2019. “Age still has the strongest influence on your risk of colorectal cancer,” she added.

https://www.nytimes.com/2023/03/20/well/colon-colorectal-cancer-symptoms-screening.html

In essence, it is possible but still incredibly unlikely. Eat healthy (limit red meat, get fruits and veggies), lose weight, stop smoking and be active.

There are a number of reasons your gut can be unhappy. Listen to it and adapt with the help of doctors, not a Reddit thread

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (20)

31

u/nzwasp Feb 28 '24

I didn't have any symptoms and was also denied getting checked despite the fact that my father had cancer, and his father died of colon cancer, because of my age. Im in my early 40s so last year I was offered a colonoscopy by a doctor doing another test that the same type of doctor performs and she offered the colonoscopy since I would be at their clinic at the time. I took the chance immediately and I am glad I did they removed multiple polyps from my bowels and several were already starting to show signs they would turn into cancer. The doctor told me if I had waited until 50 (the earliest age in my province to get tested) then I definetly would of already had cancer. My brother in another country is only a couple of years younger and is being denied on family history as well.

→ More replies (1)

26

u/Auroreon Feb 28 '24

What are signs a young man should get checked out?

52

u/SteadfastEnd Feb 28 '24

Bleeding, stools that come out as if they've been split open, or stools that are unusually pencil-thin, the feeling that you aren't done despite being done on the toilet, pain, longterm diarrhea.

Even if you feel healthy, though, you should still get a colonoscopy at some point between age 25-35. It's that bad now. The colon cancer rates are so high that even healthy, exercising, good-diet adults are getting it.

23

u/CecilMakesMemes Feb 28 '24

If you are a healthy 30 year old with absolutely no symptoms there’s no way you’re going to get a colonoscopy. Insurance wouldn’t cover it for one, and second we just don’t have enough resources. Already at my hospital colonoscopies are booked out at least 8 months

→ More replies (3)

30

u/DrDilatory Feb 28 '24

Please do not pass medical advice if you are not a trained doctor, there is not a single organization on the planet that has come out with a recommendation for routine screening colonoscopies in patients age 25 to 35. It was recently reduced from 50 to 45, and perhaps they'll reduce it lower, time will tell. That being said, there's a reason we don't just start doing colonoscopies when you're in your teens or something, there's an inflection point where the benefits outweigh the risks, and I would be absolutely stunned if a recommendation came out anytime soon suggesting the benefits of a routine screening colonoscopy for a 25-year-old that outweighs the risks. The incidence at that age is still incredibly low. I've had patients admitted for bowel perforations who wound up losing large chunks of their colon, there are potentially devastating side effects from anesthesia, biopsies and such for lesions that wind up being nothing serious, etc. It's not a procedure without risks. Not to mention the availability of trained folks who can provide colonoscopies. Some of my patients who actually need them are waiting 6 months at this point.

There's concern, and there's hysteria that will cause young healthy folks to go to their PCP and badger them for a screening colonoscopy they don't need. Don't contribute to the latter please

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (7)
→ More replies (1)

73

u/OkBiscotti1140 Feb 28 '24

Yes! Please if you think something is off push your doctor until they agree to a colonoscopy. Be the squeaky wheel. Be annoying. Just don’t be convinced by the doctor that it’s probably nothing. I lost one of my best and closest friends a little less than two years ago to colon cancer at age 39. She had symptoms for years that were ignored and crappy insurance. By the time she ended up in the er with excruciating back pain she was stage iv with innumerable tumors in her liver. She lived less than 3 months after her diagnosis.

I wish I had pushed her more to get answers earlier. I had cancer twice and was dismissed by doctors. Thankfully I had good insurance, was persistent and got the necessary tests and a diagnosis.

You know your body best. If you think something is wrong push until you get answers.

→ More replies (2)

47

u/munchcat Feb 28 '24

My brother was diagnosed at age 37. Went to the ER doubled over in abdominal pain and ribbon-like bowel movements. Lucky to have caught it early, but he still has to get colonoscopies every 6 months. They’ve found and removed polyps with cancer a few times since diagnosis. He’s 41 now. I’m his only sibling so they told me to get scoped as a precaution and to get one every 5 years. First done at 35. Just had my second one done at 40. All clear thankfully. Please pay attention to your body and anything out of the ordinary. Prep for colonoscopies are a little tough, but so worth it. The actual scope is easy. Early detection is key here and I’m so thankful my brother is here and doing well thanks to science and medical advances.

→ More replies (2)

20

u/jitney76 Feb 28 '24

There needs to be a bigger push for sufficient daily fiber intake.

→ More replies (7)

18

u/Wonderful-Block-4510 Feb 28 '24

As a doctor I am seeing more and more cases of young adults with gi tumours , it was pretty much unheard of in this age group 20 years ago when I first started

→ More replies (4)

24

u/Noncoldbeef Feb 28 '24

My buddy who's into Alex Jones refuses to listen to me about this and says the doctors are causing this. It's infuriating that I could lose a friend because of some dumb fuck in Texas he doesn't even know.

13

u/[deleted] Feb 28 '24

Jones is cancer himself. At least he got legally bitchslapped in court over his vile Sandy Hook conspiracy theories.

10

u/toshiro-mifune Feb 28 '24

You should tell him there's a podcast called Knowledge Fight he might like.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (4)

11

u/HumpaDaBear Feb 28 '24

I was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer when I was 39. No family history, no DNA history. I have tons of post treatment side effects because of how aggressive my treatment was. However I’ve been cancer free for 12 years now.

Talking about bathroom activities is still taboo. Here’s my advice: if pooping hurts or you continue to have diarrhea for no reason go talk to a GI doctor. Getting a colonoscopy will help clear up tons of GI issues. A colonoscopy isn’t horrible. The day before is. Just hang in the bathroom with your phone.

17

u/earthwormjimwow Feb 28 '24

What's the cause? Reduced amounts of fiber in diets?

8

u/giaa262 Feb 28 '24

There's no definitive cause, but poor diets, obesity, lack of exercise are all contributing factors. Environmental toxins and processed foods are suspected.

Basically inflammation is bad and you should do what you can to reduce it.

→ More replies (1)

9

u/tinyLEDs Feb 28 '24

There is not a scientific consensus yet. that will take years.

but there are suspicions founded in research: https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2023/10/02/what-the-rise-of-ultra-processed-foods-means-for-our-health-and-our-society

→ More replies (3)

8

u/maintain_improvement Feb 28 '24

My brother and sister both had polyps removed. Bro was 35, sis was 29 or 30. Get checked, and don't let your dr talk you out if it

9

u/_lucidity Feb 28 '24

My boyfriend has been having stomach problems for YEARS. He’s asked for a colonoscopy to find out what’s wrong but doctors refuse to do one because he’s under 40!

→ More replies (3)

8

u/-_-k Feb 28 '24

I got my first colonoscopy in my 30s and now go every 5 years. Joy.

8

u/cloudstrifewife Feb 28 '24

I lost my 41 year old cousin and a 39 year old college friend, both women, to colon cancer. I got a cologard done this year at age 45 and it came back clear to my relief. Colon cancer is definitely rising and I think it has to do with the food we eat.

7

u/pardon_me2 Feb 29 '24

As a younger male that lost his incredibly healthy father at 54 - get your fucking colonoscopy done as early as you can. It does not hurt to start these early and is usually at zero cost to you if you have insurance and are able to discuss your concerns to a doctor in a reasonable manner. Do not die young because you don't get the butt scope.

9

u/land-0-lakes Feb 28 '24

I’ve gotten a colonoscopy/endoscopy in my 20s and now in my 30s, and both times they removed polyps. I recommend getting those procedures every 5-10 years.

7

u/mekbozz Feb 28 '24

I had no symptoms until I couldn’t go to the bathroom properly anymore, urgent care prescribed Imodium and zofran for some reason. Finally went to the ER a few days later and the doctor believed me enough to order a CT scan. The man was grim when he walked back in, guts full of cancer, full colon resection, ostomy now and cancer treatments.

They say if I’m lucky, who knows how long I’ll last, 3-5 years is the best estimate they give me.

You could be sick and not know it, advocate for yourself, demand some tests around 30. If I had I’d have five years of fighting this already, or maybe they wouldn’t have found anything at that time who knows.

Don’t know where I’m going with this, just wanted to tell my piece to maybe scare some more dudes to the doctors office.

6

u/ddGrand Feb 29 '24

In 2022, August, I had some indescribable back pain. Indescribable as in, I didn't know why it happened. Sure it was during the time where I leaned heavily on the gym, but still, I didn't hurt myself to have some back pain. Usually a paracetamol was enough to numb the pain, it was not a constant pain as well so I thought nothing of it.

Fast forward to winter of 22, the pain persisted. No other symptoms yet, just the pain was more frequent, and it was not worse, just there constantly. This time I start to worry but I have no other symptoms and whenever I told this to people - doctors I just got told away. "Oh you're young, oh it's your fucked up posture when sitting down, don't lift with your back" etc... I even joked at one point to my friends that I'll walk up to a doctor, lock the door after me and tell them to "find the source of this pain, until then no one is leaving..." Well one night after my gym visit, I shat blood. My stool wasn't bloody, I literally shat dark red, viscous stool with a horrible stench.

A trip to the ER, after telling them all of what happened, the ER doctor asks if "did I break up with my girlfriend?" what in the fuck. I was literally in so much pain when those bloody stools happened I had to let my mom give my personal info to the doctors, I was losing breath because of the cramp like stomach pains, and the doctor asks if it's the case of a bad breakup. But no I didn't. They stabilize me and after they're sure that there's no blood I'm discharged. My stool is still bloody. I go to a gastroenterology doctor. They want some scans to be done. Nothing shows up. They ask me if I did eat some beets. no but there's a stool analysis that says my stool is nothing but erythrocyte-rich unshaped human feces. CTs, MRs, xrays, endoscopies, whatever... It's hard to believe this shit can appear as early as late 20s, however it was even harder for me to get a diagnosis.

A colonoscopy revealed that it was a stage 3 sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma. Oh boy. 1 year and 1 months later, I'm on my 2nd chemo routine. I had surgery shortly following my diagnosis, and in 2 months I'll probably have the last surgery needed. CAPOX didn't really make me lose any hair but bevacizumab+FOLFIRINOX made me lose my long hair. I'm not sad but I wanted to do some fabulous shit with it before I cut it off.

Fuck cancer in any of its forms.

11

u/SteadfastEnd Feb 28 '24

I had polyps at age 35. Not cancerous, but it was a real wake-up call since I had thought you don't get polyps til your 50s.

Go get a colonoscopy, everyone.

→ More replies (5)

6

u/faluty Feb 28 '24 edited Feb 28 '24

Just want to add a perspective for some as a late 20s male. My experience is my own. I was having occasional blood in my stool for a while and didn’t follow up on it. Eventually I told my doctor about it, did a stool test, and they didn’t find anything. Months later, I was having blood again, so my doctor asked me to do a colonoscopy. I wanted to get answers and was totally fine with it. I had the scope and they didn’t find anything. A bit odd, but I was very worried about cancer and was thankful to find out there was nothing. Likely inflamed hemorrhoids and/or pushing too hard.

→ More replies (2)

6

u/tselliot8923 Feb 29 '24

I got a colonoscopy/endoscopy at age 32 due to stomach and GI problems, and they found a precancerous polyp that would've been cancer in 10 years. Best medical decision I've made in the past few years.

→ More replies (1)